Connect with us
A small urban garden on a balcony of an apartment.

Homesteading

7 Small Space Homesteading Tips

Turn your tiny space into a thriving oasis of sustainable living.

If the idea of homesteading seems like a pipe dream because you lack space – think again. 

With a little creativity and resourcefulness, those living in small spaces can embrace the spirit of homesteading. 

Whether you have a tiny backyard, a balcony, or just a windowsill, it’s totally possible to turn your tiny space into a thriving oasis of sustainable living.

Keep reading for 7 tips for small space homesteading. 

Two men growing plants up a homemade trellis.

#1 Grow Up

When it comes to small space gardening, thinking vertically is the key. 

Vertical gardening allows you to maximize your space by utilizing walls, fences, and trellises. 

Invest in hanging planters or vertical planters, or create your own using repurposed materials. This will allow you to grow a wide variety of herbs, vegetables, and even fruits in your small space. 

[Check out 10 Benefits of Vertical Gardening]

#2 Use Container Pots

Containers are a small space homesteader’s best friend.

Whether you have a balcony, porch, or just a windowsill, you can create a container garden to grow an impressive array of plants – from herbs to tomatoes.

Choose pots of various sizes and materials, ensuring they have proper drainage. 

Opt for a lightweight potting mix and consider self-watering containers for convenience. 

#3 Plant Lots of Herbs

One of the easiest and most rewarding ways to start your small space homestead is by growing herbs

They are compact and versatile, and can easily be grown in a windowsill or on a balcony. Basil, mint, rosemary, thyme, and parsley are just a few herbs that thrive in small spaces. 

Snip some fresh herbs whenever you need them, and savor the taste of homegrown goodness.

Homemade rain barrel hooked up to a house.

#4 Harvest Rainwater

You don’t have to have a large, sprawling space to collect rainwater.  

Install rain barrels or small water tanks to collect rainwater from your roof or balcony. 

Use this water to nourish your plants and reduce reliance on municipal water sources. 

[Check out these tips for Rainwater Harvesting]

#5 Compost What You Can

Composting is a vital practice for any homesteader, regardless of space constraints. 

You can compost kitchen scraps, yard waste, and even some paper products. 

Explore various composting methods suitable for small spaces, such as worm composting or bokashi composting.

Not only will you reduce your waste footprint, but you’ll also create nutrient-rich soil for your plants.

[Check out Composting Made Easy: Tips for the Homestead]

Old pallets repurposed to be a trellis for garden pots.

#6 Upcycle and Repurpose

Space doesn’t matter when it comes to embracing the homesteading spirit of repurposing and upcycling. 

Transform old pallets into raised beds, use mason jars for seed starting, or convert old furniture into planters. 

The possibilities are endless. Not only will you save money, but you’ll also infuse your homestead with a unique and personal touch.

#7 Practice Preparedness

Self-sufficiency is a big part of what being a homesteader is all about. And the size of your space doesn’t affect practicing preparedness.

Take the time to learn essential survival skills, such as how to build a fire or how to find water and purify it. 

Take survival classes. Get involved in your local garden club. Meet your local farmers. 

The possibilities are endless. The key is to get started and prepare now for unforeseen disasters. 

Subscribe for Free

Get access to premium content and more!

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

A person feeding chickens from their hand. A person feeding chickens from their hand.

Homestead Automation: Work Smarter

Gardening

A jar labeled "budget" filled with cash. A jar labeled "budget" filled with cash.

Homestead Financial Planning for the New Year

Homesteading

An old pine tree on its side next to a pile of brown mulch. An old pine tree on its side next to a pile of brown mulch.

16 Ways to Repurpose Your Christmas Tree After the Holidays

Homesteading

Three fabric bags filled with lush, green basil plants. The bags are sitting on a white windowsill. Three fabric bags filled with lush, green basil plants. The bags are sitting on a white windowsill.

Veggie Seeds to Sow in Winter

Gardening

Advertisement Flints Stash

Advertisement

Mountain House Sale
Subscribe for Free

Get access to premium content and more!

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2020 SurvivalJack.com

Connect
Subscribe for Free

Get access to premium content and more!